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Posts from the ‘Safety’ Category

Australian cyclist deaths surge and road safety strategy ‘failing’

The Guardian, 8 August 2018
Australia’s road safety strategy is failing, according to the nation’s peak motoring body, with cyclists recording the biggest increase in the number of road fatalities. A report by the Australian Automobile Association shows there were 1,222 deaths on the road in 2017-18 and, for the first time, all states are on track to miss the national road safety targets they signed up to in 2011.
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Nuclear power takes a hit as European heatwave rolls on

Renew Economy, 6 August 2018
A scorching European summer has been doing its best to prove that renewables are not the only energy sources at the mercy of the elements – and that climate change is a thing – with nuclear reactors from France to Finland being shut down or their output restricted due to record heat. Over the weekend, French energy company EDF said it was forced to temporarily halt four nuclear reactors in soaring temperatures, including a reactor at the country’s oldest plant, Fessenheim, to stop it from overheating the water in the nearby river

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Can the share bike business survive in Australia?

ABC News, 12 July 2018
After months of damaged and discarded bikes on city streets, it now looks like three of the four major firms who launched app-based bike sharing schemes last year have pulled up stumps.
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Driverless cars really do have health and safety benefits, if only people knew

The Conversation, 5 July 2018
Driverless cars promise many benefits, including an improvement in safety, but new research shows many people are still not aware of this. A paper, co-authored by me and published today in the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, reports that almost two thirds (63%) of the 1,624 people surveyed had neutral or negative attitudes towards driverless cars.
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Preliminary report on Uber’s driverless car fatality shows the need for tougher regulatory controls

The Conversation, 29 May 2018
The US National Transportation Safety Board has released a damning preliminary report on the fatal crash in March between a cyclist and a driverless vehicle operated by Uber. The report does not attempt to determine “probable cause”. Nevertheless, it lists a number of questionable design decisions that appear to have greatly increased the risks of a crash during the trial period.
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‘No thought’: EPA boss slams oBike rollout amid new crackdown

The Age, 30 May 2018
Bike share company oBike will be hit with hefty fines of $3000 for each dumped or damaged bike it fails to collect within a certain timeframe under a crackdown announced by the Environmental Protection Authority on Wednesday. The head of Victoria’s environmental authority has slammed the dockless bike share company for the way it entered the Melbourne market, declaring tough new regulations will send a clear message to the Singaporean-based oBike that it needs to “lift its form”.

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Dockless share bikes are the frontline of a battle between Chinese tech giants

Australian Financial Review, 27 April 2018
On April 4, 2018, when news broke that a man had dumped a bicycle on lane one of the Sydney Harbour Bridge before scaling the superstructure and causing traffic chaos, the first thought in many a Sydneysider’s mind was: “I bet it was a share bike.” It turned out it wasn’t. But those water-cooler conversations spoke volumes about the city’s troubled relationship with dockless bikes.
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Who’s to blame when driverless cars have an accident?

The Conversation, 20 March 2018
The news that an Uber self-driving vehicle has killed a pedestrian in the US has made headlines around the world. It’s a reminder that the era of self-driving cars is fast approaching. Decades of research into advanced sensors, mapping, navigation and control methods have now come to fruition and autonomous cars are starting to hit the roads in pilot trials.
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Slow cycling isn’t just for fun – it’s essential for many city workers

The Conversation, 16 March 2018
In cities, people use bicycles for far more than just commuting and recreation. For many people, riding a bike is not just a way to get to work; it is a livelihood necessity and helps sustain urban economies. And for people who rely on a bike to do their job, safe access to city roads is essential. With increasing urban pollution and poverty around the world, we urgently need to think about how to plan new cities and redesign old cities to accommodate cycling’s varied uses.
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Brussels to make public transport free on high air pollution days

The Guardian, 27 February 2018
Brussels has moved to make the city’s public transport and bike share system free on the smoggiest days in a bid to drive down pollution levels and meet EU air quality directives. After two consecutive days of high particulate matter (PM) levels – defined as surpassing an average of 51-70 micrograms per cubic metre of air – buses, trams and metros would have to open their doors completely free, under new city council rules.
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