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Posts from the ‘Safety’ Category

Airlines Braced for Expansion of Trump Laptop Ban to Europe

Bloomberg, 11 May 2017
Airlines are preparing for an anticipated widening of a U.S. ban on bringing laptops and other large electronic devices on board planes bound for American airports. Officials from United Airlines, American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and industry trade group Airlines for America are scheduled to meet with Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly in Washington Thursday afternoon to discuss details of a possible expansion, according to three people familiar with the ongoing discussions.
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United Airlines apologises for flying Paris-bound passenger 4,800km in the wrong direction

Straits Times, 8 May 2017
Under-fire United Airlines is in the news again for yet another controversy – this time for flying a passenger in the wrong direction. The passenger, Ms Lucie Bahetoukilae, was supposed to be flying from Newark, New Jersey to Paris in France, but ended up flying more than 4,800km to San Francisco instead. By the time the airline re-routed her flight to France, Ms Bahetoukilae, whose nationality is unclear, had been travelling for more than 28 hours, ABC7 News reported.
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Police and courts fail [UK] cyclists over road safety, says cross-party inquiry

The Guardian, 2 May 2017
Policing and the justice system are too often failing cyclists, making the roads too dangerous for people to ride on them, and then not properly prosecuting or banning motorists who commit offences, a cross-party group of MPs and peers has warned. Dangerous drivers are increasingly likely to be permitted by courts to stay behind the wheel, the report found, with the number of driving bans falling 62% over the last 10 years, and ever-more people claiming exceptional hardship to avoid a disqualification.
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We must plan the driverless city to avoid being hostage to the technology revolution

The Conversation, 28 April 2017
Trials of autonomous cars and buses have begun on the streets of Australian cities. Communications companies are moving to deploy the lasers, cameras and centimetre-perfect GPS that will enable a vehicle to navigate the streets of your town or city without a driver. Most research and commentary is telling us how the new machines will work, but not how they might shape our cities. The talk is of the benefits of new shared transport economies, but these new technologies will shape our built environment in ways that are not yet fully understood. There’s every chance that, if mismanaged, driverless technologies will entrench the ills of car dependency. As with Uber and the taxi industry, public sector planners and regulators will be forced to respond to the anger of those displaced by the new products the IT and automobile industries will bring to the market. But can we afford to wait?
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Smart cities can be vulnerable: That Dallas emergency siren hack is a warning of things to come

Salon, 15 April 2017
By infrastructure-hacking standards, the overnight triggering of the Dallas storm-warning system on April 7 was relatively benign. Starting at about 20 minutes before midnight more than 150 sirens across the city of 1.3 million people blared periodically, alarming residents in this tornado-prone part of the country. Worried that something was amiss, locals overloaded the city’s 911 emergency-calling system, causing what could have been harmful delays, while officials scrambled to figure out what was going on. They shut down the system at 1:17 a.m. and worked overnight with West Shore Services, a Michigan-based company hired by the city last year to maintain the network, to fix the problem, according to local news reports.
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Did Seattle’s mandatory helmet law kill off its bike-share scheme?

The Guardian, 18 April 2017
A small group of supporters, journalists and a city councilman gathered at the end of last month to take Seattle’s cycle share bikes out for one last spin. Mayor Ed Murray had pulled the plug on the Pronto system after two-and-a-half years of low ridership, financial troubles and waning political support.
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Where are they now? What public transport data reveal about lockout laws and nightlife patronage

The Conversation, 11 April 2017
It is vital that public policy be driven by rigorous research. In the last decade key policy changes have had profound impacts on nightlife in Sydney’s inner city and suburbs. The most significant and controversial of these has been the 2014 “lockout laws”. These were a series of legislative and regulatory policies aimed at reducing alcohol-related violence and disorder through new criminal penalties and key trading restrictions, including 1.30am lockouts and a 3am end to service in select urban “hotspots”.
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Air passengers face a bumpier ride due to climate change

RE neweconomy, 10 April 2017
Air passengers face various irritations when flying, from lost luggage to unappetising food. But one problem – turbulence – is not only unsettling for passengers but potentially dangerous too. What’s more, it is expected to worsen in future.

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VW ‘dieselgate’ [UK] payout offer outrageously low, says Sadiq Khan

The Guardian, 12 December 2016
Sadiq Khan has called on the government to secure proper compensation from Volkswagen for the “dieselgate” scandal, saying the £1.1m pledged so far was outrageous. The London mayor said the settlement was far too low compared with the £12bn payout achieved by US authorities for VW’s use of sophisticated “defeat devices” to cheat emissions tests.
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Clear air plans won’t punish drivers of older diesel cars, [UK] PM promises

The Guardian, 5 April 2017
Theresa May says she will not punish drivers of older diesel cars who were encouraged to buy the polluting vehicles under the Labour government. A crackdown on the vehicles to tackle poor air quality has been announced by the London mayor, Sadiq Khan, with drivers of polluting vehicles facing £24-a-day charges to drive in central London from 2019.
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