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Posts from the ‘Safety’ Category

Boeing is betting big on automating its flying machines.

CNN Money, 5 October 2017
The aerospace giant is buying Aurora Flight Sciences, a maker of automated drones and aviation parts, in a bid to bring increased automation to airliners, military drones and even personal air taxis. “The combined strength and innovation of our teams will advance the development of autonomy for our commercial and military systems,” said Greg Hyslop, chief technology officer and senior vice president of Boeing Engineering, Test & Technology in a statement.
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Bike share schemes may seem a waste of space but the economics makes sense

ABC News, 19 September 2017
Have you ever walked past (or tripped over) a shared bike and wondered how it’s possible for the business to survive with a ride costing as little as $2 per half hour? While bike share schemes attract controversy in some places, the economic models behind such schemes actually have more to do with data mining, advertising and turning a profit from interest on the deposits than from the bike rental itself.

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Cars, bicycles and the fatal myth of equal reciprocity

The Conversation, 17 August 2017
Any public conversation about on-road cycling in Australia seems to have only one metaphor for the relationship between drivers and cyclists: equal reciprocity. An utterance like “Drivers must respect cyclists’ space on the road” must inevitably be followed by something like “For their part, cyclists must ride responsibly and obey the road rules.”

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Gender makes a world of difference for safety on public transport

The Conversation, 18 July 2017
Urban environments are not gender-neutral. Architects and urban designers are increasingly seeking to understand how gender-sensitive design can combat the spatial inequities faced by those who identify as women and girls of all demographics, races and socio-economic groups. Public transport spaces, for instance, incubate many systemic issues. The observable differences between how men and women travel around cities can be attributed to the gendered power hierarchies entrenched in our society. As suggested by a University of California study, this may stem from our long history of gender inequality, which reinforces rigid binary definitions of femininity and masculinity.

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Are yellow oBikes taking over our footpaths?

The Age, 10 July 2017
By now you’ve probably seen the yellow bikes dotted across Melbourne’s landscape – maybe you’ve even tripped over one. Melbourne’s new bike sharing system oBike is certainly getting some mileage, with pushies popping up on random street corners and flooding bike racks from Richmond to the CBD.

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Trump dropping cabin computer ban, but media too deferential to say so

Crikey, 29 June 2017
The slow but laughable retreat by the Trump White House from unsafely consigning some passenger carried devices to underfloor storage on flights from countries where the president has no personal investments continues apace.
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Trucks are destroying our roads and not picking up the repair cost

The Conversation, 23 June 2017
It’s high time Australia changed its current road user charges for trucks. The shortfall between the charges for heavy vehicles and the money spent on things like road system maintenance, construction costs, road crashes involving heavy trucks, emissions, pollution and urban road congestion amounts to a taxpayer subsidy for the industry of at least A$3 billion per annum.
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Cars overwhelmingly cause bike collisions, and the law should reflect that

The Conversation, 14 June 2017
Two hundred years after their invention, bicycles are widely recognised as an effective tool to combat physical and mental health problems, reduce congestion on urban roads and improve the quality of the environment. However, cycling participation across Australia is stagnating. This is mainly because of concerns about safety. A report released last week by the Royal Automobile Association of South Australia found that in the vast majority of crashes the cyclist was not at fault.
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British Airways CEO will not resign despite ‘catastrophic’ IT failure

The Guardian, 30 May 2017
British Airways’ chief executive says he will not resign despite a “catastrophic” IT system failure that grounded scores of flights and led to cancellations and delays for 75,000 passengers over the bank holiday weekend. Alex Cruz said on Monday he was “profusely apologetic” for the computing glitch, which caused havoc at Heathrow and Gatwick airports, stranding passengers including many families on half-term breaks.
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Swapping car seats for electric bike saddles in WA

ABC News, 1 September 2016
The wheels are turning on a cycling revolution across Australia. Electric bicycles, known as e-bikes, have surged in popularity as an increasing number of people ditch driving for pedal power with an electric battery boost.
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