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Posts from the ‘Safety’ Category

Preliminary report on Uber’s driverless car fatality shows the need for tougher regulatory controls

The Conversation, 29 May 2018
The US National Transportation Safety Board has released a damning preliminary report on the fatal crash in March between a cyclist and a driverless vehicle operated by Uber. The report does not attempt to determine “probable cause”. Nevertheless, it lists a number of questionable design decisions that appear to have greatly increased the risks of a crash during the trial period.
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‘No thought’: EPA boss slams oBike rollout amid new crackdown

The Age, 30 May 2018
Bike share company oBike will be hit with hefty fines of $3000 for each dumped or damaged bike it fails to collect within a certain timeframe under a crackdown announced by the Environmental Protection Authority on Wednesday. The head of Victoria’s environmental authority has slammed the dockless bike share company for the way it entered the Melbourne market, declaring tough new regulations will send a clear message to the Singaporean-based oBike that it needs to “lift its form”.

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Dockless share bikes are the frontline of a battle between Chinese tech giants

Australian Financial Review, 27 April 2018
On April 4, 2018, when news broke that a man had dumped a bicycle on lane one of the Sydney Harbour Bridge before scaling the superstructure and causing traffic chaos, the first thought in many a Sydneysider’s mind was: “I bet it was a share bike.” It turned out it wasn’t. But those water-cooler conversations spoke volumes about the city’s troubled relationship with dockless bikes.
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Who’s to blame when driverless cars have an accident?

The Conversation, 20 March 2018
The news that an Uber self-driving vehicle has killed a pedestrian in the US has made headlines around the world. It’s a reminder that the era of self-driving cars is fast approaching. Decades of research into advanced sensors, mapping, navigation and control methods have now come to fruition and autonomous cars are starting to hit the roads in pilot trials.
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Slow cycling isn’t just for fun – it’s essential for many city workers

The Conversation, 16 March 2018
In cities, people use bicycles for far more than just commuting and recreation. For many people, riding a bike is not just a way to get to work; it is a livelihood necessity and helps sustain urban economies. And for people who rely on a bike to do their job, safe access to city roads is essential. With increasing urban pollution and poverty around the world, we urgently need to think about how to plan new cities and redesign old cities to accommodate cycling’s varied uses.
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Brussels to make public transport free on high air pollution days

The Guardian, 27 February 2018
Brussels has moved to make the city’s public transport and bike share system free on the smoggiest days in a bid to drive down pollution levels and meet EU air quality directives. After two consecutive days of high particulate matter (PM) levels – defined as surpassing an average of 51-70 micrograms per cubic metre of air – buses, trams and metros would have to open their doors completely free, under new city council rules.
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Five biases create problems with share bikes – here’s what we can do to counter them

The Conversation, 28 February 2018
Share-bike littering is a problem almost everywhere they’re introduced. In countries as diverse as China, Singapore and Ireland the bikes can be seen abandoned in the worst places. There are three elements to understanding the problems of share-bike dumping and vandalism:
* behaviour, or how we make the choices about how to act
* context, or the environment we’re in at the time the action happens, of which national culture is an important part
* cognition or how our brains process information.

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Boeing raises prospect of only one pilot in the cockpit of planes

The Guardian, 9 February 2018
Once there were three on the flight deck. Then the number of flight crew fell to two when the Boeing 757 changed the way cockpits were designed in the 1980s. Now, jetmakers are studying what it would take to go down to a single pilot, starting with cargo flights.

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‘Disgrace’: 2,000 trucks receive defect notices in police crackdown

The Guardian, 2 February 2018
A police crackdown on truck safety across Australia has resulted in 2,000 vehicles being issued with defect notices and 26 drivers testing positive for drugs in less than 24 hours. The operation, which police said was the biggest so far, follows a spate of truck crashes in New South Wales that killed five people in two days last month. Police in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and the ACT were deployed in the large-scale truck safety crackdown on Thursday, dubbed “Operation Rolling Thunder”.

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Three reasons why share-bikes don’t fit Australian culture

The Conversation, 25 January 2018
Many cities are keen on dockless share-bike schemes such as oBikes or Reddy Go, and for good reason. They promote greater physical movement, help solve transport problems in congested cities, and can be fun. But there’s a downside. Share-bikes can litter our cities and be found in rivers, up trees, in gutters, and strewn around public places. One of the reasons for this is culture.
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