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Posts from the ‘Road transport’ Category

Oliver Schmidt jailed for seven years for Volkswagen emissions scam

The Guardian, 7 December 2017
A senior Volkswagen executive was sentenced to seven years in prison by a US court on Wednesday after being found guilty of concealing software used to evade pollution limits on nearly 600,000 diesel vehicles. Oliver Schmidt, a German national who was the general manager in charge of VW’s environmental and engineering office in Michigan, had pleaded guilty to his part in the cover-up and argued he was “misused” by VW in its attempts to circumvent US emissions tests.
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Delay in changing direction on how we tax drivers will cost us all

The Conversation, 27 November 2017
The federal government announced a year ago that it would review the charges imposed on drivers for using our roads. That review hasn’t yet happened. They should get on with it, because reforming the way we charge road users will make our economy more productive and our cities more liveable. The longer we wait, the harder the path to those improvements becomes. The problem with the present system is that there is only a weak link between what motorists pay and the costs they create when they use roads. The amount motorists pay for registration, for example, does not vary with the amount of time they spend on the road, let alone how long they’re stuck in traffic jams.

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City-wide trial shows how road use charges can reduce traffic jams

The Conversation, 23 November 2017
Road congestion in large Australian cities is estimated to cost more than A$16 billion a year. Economists have long argued the best way to improve traffic flow is to charge drivers for their contribution to road congestion. We have now analysed data collected from 1,400 drivers across Melbourne to see whether road user charging can change their behaviour in ways that ease congestion. And the answer is yes.
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Electric cars’ green image blackens beneath the bonnet

Financial Times, 8 November 2017
The humble Mitsubishi Mirage has none of the hallmarks of a futuristic, environmentally friendly car. It is fuelled by petrol, runs on an internal combustion engine and spews exhaust emissions through a tailpipe.But when the Mirage is assessed for carbon emissions throughout its entire lifecycle — from procuring the components and fuel, to recycling its parts — it can actually be a greener car than a model by Tesla, the US electric vehicle pioneer, in regions with particularly high carbon emissions from electricity.
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Negative charge: why is Australia so slow at adopting electric cars?

The Conversation, 9 November 2017
In the race to adopt electric vehicles, Australia is sputtering along in the slow lane. Rather than growing, Australian sales of electric cars are actually in decline. In 2016 they represented just 0.02% of new car sales – even lower than in 2013. Contrast that with Norway, the country with the highest levels of electric car adoption. Almost 30% of new cars sold there in 2016 were electric.
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Norway Considers A “Tesla Tax” On Some Electric Cars

Clean Technica, 14 October 2017
Norway charges a tax on new cars that can actually double the list price. Heavier, more powerful cars pay more. The tax on smaller, less powerful cars is more modest. Electric cars are exempt from the tax entirely, which is one of the primary reasons electric cars in Norway are so popular.

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Stuck in traffic: we need a smarter approach to congestion than building more roads

The Conversation, 3 October 2017
The equation doesn’t look pretty. Traffic congestion costs us billions of dollars each year – so we are told – and population growth is not letting up. When road rage meets large economic costs, it’s little wonder our politicians are desperate to do something. The trouble is, too often that “something” is a great big new freeway. Building more roads isn’t the best answer, because the roads we have are mostly up to the job – if only we could make better use of them by spreading traffic out beyond the morning and evening peaks.
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Why the Tesla truck will turn freight industry upside own

REnew economy, 26 September 2017
Elon Musk has a busy month in front of him, as he usually does. This Friday, he will address a space industry conference in Adelaide about his plans for human life on Mars, and then is widely expected to deliver some major news on the Tesla big battery at the Hornsdale wind farm later that evening. A month later, Musk will unveil the latest of his technology developments that promise to turn an existing industry upside down – the Tesla Semi, a very big electric truck.

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Uber CEO apologises for ‘mistakes’ after company hit with London ban

WA Today, 26 September 2017
Uber’s chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, apologised in an open letter Monday for the company’s “mistakes,” after the transport authority for London said last week that it would not renew the ride-hailing service’s license to operate in the city. “While Uber has revolutionised the way people move in cities around the world, it’s equally true that we’ve got things wrong along the way,” Khosrowshahi wrote. “On behalf of everyone at Uber globally, I apologise for the mistakes we’ve made.”
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Volkswagen’s Entire Car Range Is Going Electric By 2030

Huffington Post, 12 September 2017
The world’s largest carmaker, Volkswagen, has pledged to electrify its entire range of cars by 2030.
Announced at the Frankfurt Motor Show, the company said it would be doubling its investment in zero-emissions vehicles. The Volkswagen Group actually contains some 12 car manufacturers including Audi, Bentley, Seat and Lamborghini.
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