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Posts from the ‘Planning’ Category

Competitive tendering hasn’t delivered for public transport, so why reward poor performance?

The Conversation, 10 October 2017
Transdev, which operates about one-third of Melbourne’s buses, recently had 33 buses taken off the road due to safety defects. Transport Safety Victoria’s action coincides with a review of a three-year rollover of the French company’s A$1.7 billion contract. The contract was announced in 2013 following competitive tendering. This confluence of events raises at least two questions about contracting for transport services. Australian state governments should reflect on whether competitive tendering necessarily delivers the best outcomes for the public, and on the role of operator performance in contract renewal.
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Revealed: every Londoner breathing dangerous levels of toxic air particle

The Guardian, 5 October 2017
The scale of London’s air pollution crisis was laid bare on Wednesday, with new figures showing that every person in the capital is breathing air that exceeds global guidelines for one of the most dangerous toxic particles. The research, based on the latest updated London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory, shows that every area in the capital exceeds World Health Organisation (WHO) limits for a damaging type of particle known as PM2.5.
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In a Warming World, Keeping the Planes Running

New York Times, 30 September 2017
Airports are a major global business, part of an industry that by one estimate transports the equivalent of nearly half the world’s population in a single year. But the world’s airports were largely designed for an older era — a cooler one.
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Seminar: The Electrification of Australia’s Land Transport: How to get Moving by Dr Michael Kane

Wednesday October 25th 2017, Time: 12 pm – 1 pm
Synopsis
Dr Michael Kane will present the current efforts in Queensland to electrify land transport. His will also take us through some of his thoughts on whether the goal of 100% renewable land transport is feasible. He will discuss potential policies and practices that might make this possible.

Reflecting on this what will be interesting is that the intensification of road transport will also occur with electric AVs but not sufficiently to impact on peak major trunk PT. Lesser traditional PT and local private car trips will likely be replaced by a hybrid version of Uber/taxis/on demand transport. Private AV car use will have to be subject to road pricing or the road network will grind to a halt. What is also challenging from another perspective is that late night PT trunk is likely to unviable outside very large cities and slow and inefficient rail/light rail will also come into question as to why they shouldn’t be converted to ‘shared’ AV only highways (existing rail lines in Perth are all good performers). It will be a much more competitive environment in many ways, and everyone’s mode loyalties are going to be challenged. Trunk PT will also have to drop in price to remain competitive which should be possible with the dropping of subsidised non-trunk services.

With the recent pricing on hydrogen fuel cells (coming from 100% renewables) for buses and trucks is it realistic to assume to assume that all land transport is capable of transitioning technology wise for no additional vehicle costs from some point in the next decade? While there may be some infrastructure and industry changeover costs, the real challenge will be changing people’s mind-sets.

About the Presenter

Dr Michael Kane is the Director of Innovation and Economic Strategies at Economic Development Queensland. Dr Kane’s role is to support EDQ’s innovative planning and development initiatives relating to regional development, sustainable energy/water, housing, knowledge economy and transport. Michael has worked with EDQ (and Urban Land Development Authority) since 2009 in sustainability, innovation and strategy advisory roles. Before this he was an adviser for the Minister for Planning and Infrastructure in Western Australia on land development, transport and strategic planning. He has a PhD from Curtin University with his thesis relating to knowledge economy, urban and transport planning.

Event Details
Event: CUSP Seminar: The Electrification of Australia’s
Land Transport: How to get Moving by Dr. Michael Kane.
Date: Wednesday October 25th 2017
Time: 12 pm – 1 pm
Location: [Norman Dufty Lecture Theatre – Bldg 210, Rm 102]
Curtin University
Kent Street, Bentley
RSVP: Please RSVP your attendance by [Tues – 26/10/2017].
Early responses are appreciated.

Event registration
christine.finlay@curtin.edu.au
Please Contact Christine Finlay by [26/10/2017] to register you interest in attending this event.

Paris Banned Cars For The Day And It Looked Stunning

Huffington Post, 2 October 2017
Paris has pulled off its most ambitious ‘car-free day’ yet, with 105 square kilometres of the French capital set aside for pedestrians and cyclists. In its third year, the ban on all private cars and motorised bikes took place between 11am and 6pm on Sunday in a fight against air pollution in the city. The only exceptions were for taxis, public transport and emergency vehicles — and if police caught Parisians driving, they faced fines of up to $200.

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Stuck in traffic: we need a smarter approach to congestion than building more roads

The Conversation, 3 October 2017
The equation doesn’t look pretty. Traffic congestion costs us billions of dollars each year – so we are told – and population growth is not letting up. When road rage meets large economic costs, it’s little wonder our politicians are desperate to do something. The trouble is, too often that “something” is a great big new freeway. Building more roads isn’t the best answer, because the roads we have are mostly up to the job – if only we could make better use of them by spreading traffic out beyond the morning and evening peaks.
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We’re investing heavily in urban greening, so how are our cities doing?

The Conversation, 27 September 2017
Governments at all levels invest a lot in greening Australian suburbs. Yet, in a recent report, we show that the greening efforts of most of our metropolitan local governments are actually going backwards.
This is a puzzle, as greening has clear environmental and economic benefits. The environmental benefits are obvious and relatively easy to count. For private home owners, numerous studies have linked greening to a range of economic benefits from energy savings to higher house prices. So how do we explain the loss of green cover?
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Australia wind energy’s record day of production in August

REnew economy, 22 September 2017
Australia set a new record for wind energy production on August 16, producing an average 3,629MW over one 30 minute settlement period to the National Electricity Market (which doesn’t include W.A. or the Northern Territory). The record, noted by Hugh Saddler in The Australia Institute-sponsored monthly update of emissions and energy supply, meant that wind energy counted for more than 17 per cent of total grid demand.

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Why the Tesla truck will turn freight industry upside own

REnew economy, 26 September 2017
Elon Musk has a busy month in front of him, as he usually does. This Friday, he will address a space industry conference in Adelaide about his plans for human life on Mars, and then is widely expected to deliver some major news on the Tesla big battery at the Hornsdale wind farm later that evening. A month later, Musk will unveil the latest of his technology developments that promise to turn an existing industry upside down – the Tesla Semi, a very big electric truck.

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Uber CEO apologises for ‘mistakes’ after company hit with London ban

WA Today, 26 September 2017
Uber’s chief executive, Dara Khosrowshahi, apologised in an open letter Monday for the company’s “mistakes,” after the transport authority for London said last week that it would not renew the ride-hailing service’s license to operate in the city. “While Uber has revolutionised the way people move in cities around the world, it’s equally true that we’ve got things wrong along the way,” Khosrowshahi wrote. “On behalf of everyone at Uber globally, I apologise for the mistakes we’ve made.”
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