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Posts from the ‘Planning’ Category

Higher density and diversity: apartments are Australia at its most multicultural

The Conversation, 19 June 2018
Increasing numbers of city dwellers live in apartments. This is particularly the case for migrants. And that makes apartment buildings important hubs of multiculturalism in our cities. However, our recent research shows that researchers and policymakers have largely overlooked the implications of this combination of increasing cultural diversity and increasing housing density. We live in an environment of increasing cultural diversity. But we also see increasing racism in Australian society, as well as a rise in racialised tension about Chinese property buyers.
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Time to rethink your SUV? Australia’s cars among the dirtiest, new report warns

Sydney Morning Herald, 12 June 2018
Australia’s car emissions are dirtier than those of Europe and the US, with experts pointing to Australians’ love of SUVs. In Australia, cars last year had a carbon emissions intensity of 171.5 grams per kilometre – 45 per cent higher than Europe (118.5gm/km), a new National Transport Commission report warns. This was also higher than the US, according to a separate analysis by an independent nonprofit, International Council on Clean Transportation, which set the measure for vehicle efficiency at 141g/km.

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Australia EV uptake hindered by long road to price parity

RE new economy, 8 June 2018
Australia is lagging well behind the rest of the world in EV sales, and one of the key reasons for this is because Australians have to drive further before the cost of owning an electric vehicle breaks even, a new report says.
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Nature’s traffic engineers have come up with many simple but effective solutions

The Conversation, 7 June 2018
As more and more people move to cities, the experience of being stuck in impenetrable gridlock becomes an increasingly common part of the human experience. But managing traffic isn’t just a human problem. From the tunnels built by termites to the enormous underground networks built by fungi, life forms have evolved incredible ways of solving the challenge of moving large numbers of individuals and resources from one place to another.

But how do natural systems – which lack engineers or in some cases even brains – build and manage their transportation networks?
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Three 20-plus storey towers to sit around new Waterloo metro station

Sydney Morning Herald, 31 May 2018
Seven hundred apartments will be built on a large block around a new rail station in inner-Sydney Waterloo, government documents show. The Waterloo “Metro Quarter” proposal by the government’s UrbanGrowth Development Corporation and Sydney Metro, made available on Wednesday, includes four residential towers of 29, 25, 23 and 14 storeys.

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Proving Ground: This U.K. Facility Is Preparing To Put The World’s Largest Wind Turbine To Test

GE Reports, 30 May 2018
Marc Sala has a huge challenge on his hands. The giant turbine he’s helping bring to market, the Haliade-X, will stand 260 meters tall, about the same height as New York’s iconic 30 Rockefeller Plaza skyscraper. With blades that are longer than a football field, the turbine will have a generator capable of producing 12 megawatts — 2.5 MW more than current turbines and enough to supply the equivalent energy needed to supply 16,000 homes. It could be a game-changer for the power industry.
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ICE lobby strikes out against car emissions standards

REnew Economy, 31 May 2018
Australia’s car industry lobby has launched a major new kick-back against car emissions standards being proposed for light vehicles in Australia, underscoring the uphill battle the nation faces in the shift to electric vehicles. The Murdoch papers on Thursday reported dire warnings from the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries that an emissions standard being “actively considered” by the Turnbull government would take some of the nation’s highest selling cars out of the market.

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Preliminary report on Uber’s driverless car fatality shows the need for tougher regulatory controls

The Conversation, 29 May 2018
The US National Transportation Safety Board has released a damning preliminary report on the fatal crash in March between a cyclist and a driverless vehicle operated by Uber. The report does not attempt to determine “probable cause”. Nevertheless, it lists a number of questionable design decisions that appear to have greatly increased the risks of a crash during the trial period.
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‘No thought’: EPA boss slams oBike rollout amid new crackdown

The Age, 30 May 2018
Bike share company oBike will be hit with hefty fines of $3000 for each dumped or damaged bike it fails to collect within a certain timeframe under a crackdown announced by the Environmental Protection Authority on Wednesday. The head of Victoria’s environmental authority has slammed the dockless bike share company for the way it entered the Melbourne market, declaring tough new regulations will send a clear message to the Singaporean-based oBike that it needs to “lift its form”.

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Why there will be no new petrol cars sold in Australia by 2027

REnew Economy, 28 May 2018
Much of the public and media commentators fail to pay full attention to the transportation disruption the world is about to go through, many consider it’s going to happen but believe the change will be very slow, a 30 to 50 year process is the general opinion. Well here’s my prediction: by 2027 there will be no sales of new 100 per cent internal combustion engine vehicles (ICE) in Australia.

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