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Posts from the ‘Planning’ Category

Expect more ‘complete surprises’ from climate change: NASA’s Schmidt

The Canberra Times, 12 February 2018
The eruption of pine bark beetles that has devastated millions of hectares of forests in North America is an example of the surprises yet to come as the planet warms, says Gavin Schmidt, head of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies. The tiny beetles, which have infested forests from Colorado to Alaska, develop a type of anti-freeze as winter arrives. With fewer cold snaps before the insects are “cold hardened”, more of them are making it through to spring.
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How do you build a healthy city? Copenhagen reveals its secrets

The Guardian, 12 February 2018
The Danish capital ranks high on the list of the world’s healthiest and happiest cities. With obesity and depression on the rise worldwide, here are its lessons for how to combat them culturally.
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Boeing raises prospect of only one pilot in the cockpit of planes

The Guardian, 9 February 2018
Once there were three on the flight deck. Then the number of flight crew fell to two when the Boeing 757 changed the way cockpits were designed in the 1980s. Now, jetmakers are studying what it would take to go down to a single pilot, starting with cargo flights.

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‘Disgrace’: 2,000 trucks receive defect notices in police crackdown

The Guardian, 2 February 2018
A police crackdown on truck safety across Australia has resulted in 2,000 vehicles being issued with defect notices and 26 drivers testing positive for drugs in less than 24 hours. The operation, which police said was the biggest so far, follows a spate of truck crashes in New South Wales that killed five people in two days last month. Police in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and the ACT were deployed in the large-scale truck safety crackdown on Thursday, dubbed “Operation Rolling Thunder”.

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Qantas uses mustard seeds in first ever biofuel flight between Australia and US

The Guardian, 30 January 2018
A Qantas plane powered partly by mustard seeds has become the world’s first biofuel flight between Australia and the United States, after landing in Melbourne on Tuesday. The 15-hour flight used a blended fuel that was 10% derived from the brassica carinata, an industrial type of mustard seed that functions as a fallow crop – meaning it can be grown by farmers in between regular crop cycles.

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Even top oil producers see the wisdom of going solar

eSolar Energy News, 14 February 2017
The nation most identified with its massive oil reserves is turning to wind and solar to generate power at home and help extend the life of its crucial crude franchise.
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Australia debates value of electric vehicles while China pushes ahead

Sydney Morning Herald, 27 January 2018
When Hong Dan, 26, bought her first car six months ago, the choice to go electric was simple. First, in pollution-conscious Beijing, getting a licence plate for an electric car is easier than a petrol car.
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Cycle miles double in China thanks to dockless bike sharing

Bike Biz, 26 January 2018
Before the advent of dockless bike-sharing in Chinese cities cycling accounted for 5.5% of transport miles. It has now more than doubled to 11.6%. This is according to White Book of Shared Bike and City Development 2017, a Chinese-language report from the Beijing Tsinghua Tongheng Innovation Institute, an urban planning consultancy. According to the Chinese State Information Center’s Sharing Economy Research Center there are now 16 million dockless bicycles in the country, and each was used an average of three times a day.

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Three reasons why share-bikes don’t fit Australian culture

The Conversation, 25 January 2018
Many cities are keen on dockless share-bike schemes such as oBikes or Reddy Go, and for good reason. They promote greater physical movement, help solve transport problems in congested cities, and can be fun. But there’s a downside. Share-bikes can litter our cities and be found in rivers, up trees, in gutters, and strewn around public places. One of the reasons for this is culture.
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Fixation on timing of peak oil is ‘misguided’

Financial Times, 18 January 2018
The electric car revolution and stricter global rules on emissions have focused debate in the energy sector on when decades of growth in oil demand will eventually peak. But Spencer Dale, chief economist at energy major BP and former Bank of England policymaker, has challenged the industry to come up with a better question. In a co-authored report with Bassam Fattouh at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies, which reignited discussion in the oil industry this week, they argue the sector’s fixation about the timing of peak demand is “misguided”.

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