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Posts from the ‘Author is External News’ Category

Victoria’s bike lane budget lags behind most other states, report finds

The Age, 19 May 2017
Victorian cyclists have been short-changed by the Andrews government in the past two years, with a new report revealing it spent just $3 per person on cycling projects last financial year, the second lowest level in the country. Cycling group Bicycle Network said many of Melbourne’s principal bike routes were being neglected, putting a growing number of cyclists at risk of being hit.
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Get used to your commute: data confirms houses near jobs are too expensive

The Conversation, 18 May 2017
Australia’s capital cities are getting more and more units, that are largely concentrated and come with a hefty price tag, a new report shows. And while these areas also have lots of jobs, the high price for houses means many on low incomes won’t be able to access that employment. Between 2006 and 2014, more than 50% of new units were built in the 20% of local government areas with the highest number of jobs. When compared internationally, it would seem that Australian housing supply has not been as weak as is widely believed. However, the report points to some stark differences in housing supply patterns, emerging across Australia’s capital cities.
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How developers and artists can create a more vibrant Canberra

All Homes, 13 May 2017
Head of the Property Council of Australia’s Canberra office for more than a decade, Catherine Carter now heads up a boutique consulting firm, Indigo Consulting Australia, where she retains an active interest and focus on urban environments, community building and diversity. We’ve all heard of art for art’s sake. But art can also be a driver of economic development. Tony Trobe talks to Catherine Carter about how Canberra’s artists and developers can work together to build a vibrant city.
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Tram ticket inspectors ‘demand to see woman’s banking details to prove ID’

The Age, 8 May 2017
The conduct of ticket inspectors on a Melbourne tram has been questioned after claims they demanded a woman show her banking details to prove her identity. Rob Corr was catching a tram home on Sunday afternoon, outside RMIT, when he overheard a Public Transport Victoria ticket inspector ask an overseas student to log into the banking app on her mobile phone.
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Origin stuns industry with record low price for 530MW wind farm

REnew economy, 8 May 2017
Origin Energy has set a stunning new benchmark for renewable energy off-take deals in Australia – and sounded the alarm for energy incumbents – after committing to a long-term power purchase agreement of below $60/MWh for the 530MW Stockyard Hill Wind Farm in Victoria.
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Higher-density cities need greening to stay healthy and liveable

The Conversation, 5 May 2017
Access to high-quality public open space is a key ingredient of healthy, liveable cities. This has long been recognised in government planning policy, based on a large body of academic research showing that accessible green spaces lead to better health outcomes. However, cities are home to more than just people. We also need to accommodate the critters and plants who live in them. This includes the species who called our cities home before we did.
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We must plan the driverless city to avoid being hostage to the technology revolution

The Conversation, 28 April 2017
Trials of autonomous cars and buses have begun on the streets of Australian cities. Communications companies are moving to deploy the lasers, cameras and centimetre-perfect GPS that will enable a vehicle to navigate the streets of your town or city without a driver. Most research and commentary is telling us how the new machines will work, but not how they might shape our cities. The talk is of the benefits of new shared transport economies, but these new technologies will shape our built environment in ways that are not yet fully understood. There’s every chance that, if mismanaged, driverless technologies will entrench the ills of car dependency. As with Uber and the taxi industry, public sector planners and regulators will be forced to respond to the anger of those displaced by the new products the IT and automobile industries will bring to the market. But can we afford to wait?
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Cities are complex systems – let’s start looking at them that way

The Conversation, 26 April 2017
The way we design our cities needs a serious rethink. After thousands of years of progress in urban development, we plateaued some 60 years ago. Cities are not safer, healthier, more efficient, or more equitable. They are getting worse on these measures. The statistics on chronic disease, rising road tolls and congestion in our urban environments paint a bleak future. The clues to why lie in how we think about and design our cities.
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Rooftop solar now Queensland’s biggest power station

RE neweconomy, 12 April 2017
The 1,805MW of solar PV capacity on the rooftops of Queensland homes and business now amount to be the biggest power station by capacity in the state, overtaking the 1,780MW of the Gladstone coal fired power station.
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Where are they now? What public transport data reveal about lockout laws and nightlife patronage

The Conversation, 11 April 2017
It is vital that public policy be driven by rigorous research. In the last decade key policy changes have had profound impacts on nightlife in Sydney’s inner city and suburbs. The most significant and controversial of these has been the 2014 “lockout laws”. These were a series of legislative and regulatory policies aimed at reducing alcohol-related violence and disorder through new criminal penalties and key trading restrictions, including 1.30am lockouts and a 3am end to service in select urban “hotspots”.
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