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Posts from the ‘Author is External News’ Category

Slow cycling isn’t just for fun – it’s essential for many city workers

The Conversation, 16 March 2018
In cities, people use bicycles for far more than just commuting and recreation. For many people, riding a bike is not just a way to get to work; it is a livelihood necessity and helps sustain urban economies. And for people who rely on a bike to do their job, safe access to city roads is essential. With increasing urban pollution and poverty around the world, we urgently need to think about how to plan new cities and redesign old cities to accommodate cycling’s varied uses.
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Intelligence committee wants national fuel stocks boosted to protect national security

ABC News, 16 March 2018
Parliament’s national security committee wants Australia’s low fuel supplies bolstered within six months to protect national security.

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Greens push for electric only cars on Australian roads by 2030

ABC News, 13 March 2018
The sale of new petrol and diesel cars would be banned from 2030, under a proposal by the Greens to get more electric cars on the roads.
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Fact check: Does a Toyota Corolla emit less than a Tesla?

ABC News, 7 March 2018
The claim
Since the summer break, tensions have been simmering within the Coalition over electric vehicles. Although Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg has thrown his support behind electric cars, some on the government benches are yet to be convinced. In a debate with UNSW’s Gail Broadbent, who specialises in electric vehicle research, on ABC’s RN Drive, Craig Kelly, a Government backbencher who sits on the House of Representatives Standing Committee on the Environment and Energy, challenged the notion that electric cars should attract a taxpayer-funded subsidy to encourage their proliferation.
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Solar power: What happens when we start producing more electricity than we can consume?

ABC News, 7 March 2018
While Australia leads the world in the use of rooftop solar power, some experts say there could soon be too much power coming online — and governments will have little choice but to cut subsidies.
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The west has Melbourne’s worst commutes – four hours a day across town

The Age, 7 March 2018
It’s 8.56am and Victoria Rogan is already anxious. She’s on the first leg of a hellish, two-hour journey from her Wyndham Vale home to Monash University in Clayton: a cross-city trip involving a car, two trains and a bus.
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Five biases create problems with share bikes – here’s what we can do to counter them

The Conversation, 28 February 2018
Share-bike littering is a problem almost everywhere they’re introduced. In countries as diverse as China, Singapore and Ireland the bikes can be seen abandoned in the worst places. There are three elements to understanding the problems of share-bike dumping and vandalism:
* behaviour, or how we make the choices about how to act
* context, or the environment we’re in at the time the action happens, of which national culture is an important part
* cognition or how our brains process information.

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‘Disgrace’: 2,000 trucks receive defect notices in police crackdown

The Guardian, 2 February 2018
A police crackdown on truck safety across Australia has resulted in 2,000 vehicles being issued with defect notices and 26 drivers testing positive for drugs in less than 24 hours. The operation, which police said was the biggest so far, follows a spate of truck crashes in New South Wales that killed five people in two days last month. Police in New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and the ACT were deployed in the large-scale truck safety crackdown on Thursday, dubbed “Operation Rolling Thunder”.

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Qantas uses mustard seeds in first ever biofuel flight between Australia and US

The Guardian, 30 January 2018
A Qantas plane powered partly by mustard seeds has become the world’s first biofuel flight between Australia and the United States, after landing in Melbourne on Tuesday. The 15-hour flight used a blended fuel that was 10% derived from the brassica carinata, an industrial type of mustard seed that functions as a fallow crop – meaning it can be grown by farmers in between regular crop cycles.

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Three reasons why share-bikes don’t fit Australian culture

The Conversation, 25 January 2018
Many cities are keen on dockless share-bike schemes such as oBikes or Reddy Go, and for good reason. They promote greater physical movement, help solve transport problems in congested cities, and can be fun. But there’s a downside. Share-bikes can litter our cities and be found in rivers, up trees, in gutters, and strewn around public places. One of the reasons for this is culture.
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