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Posts from the ‘Locale is International’ Category

Australia EV uptake hindered by long road to price parity

RE new economy, 8 June 2018
Australia is lagging well behind the rest of the world in EV sales, and one of the key reasons for this is because Australians have to drive further before the cost of owning an electric vehicle breaks even, a new report says.
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Nature’s traffic engineers have come up with many simple but effective solutions

The Conversation, 7 June 2018
As more and more people move to cities, the experience of being stuck in impenetrable gridlock becomes an increasingly common part of the human experience. But managing traffic isn’t just a human problem. From the tunnels built by termites to the enormous underground networks built by fungi, life forms have evolved incredible ways of solving the challenge of moving large numbers of individuals and resources from one place to another.

But how do natural systems – which lack engineers or in some cases even brains – build and manage their transportation networks?
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First two retired A380 superjumbos to be broken up for parts

Traveller, 7 June 2018
Two of Airbus’s flagship A380 superjumbos are headed for the scrap heap after a search for new operators failed to secure firm bids.

Negotiations with British Airways, Iran Air and Hi Fly, a Portuguese charter specialist, ended without any deals, German investment fund Dr. Peters, which manages the planes, said in a statement to shareholders. The aircraft are already parked in the foothills of the French Pyrenees, where they will be filleted over the next two years by a specialist company and sold in parts.

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Proving Ground: This U.K. Facility Is Preparing To Put The World’s Largest Wind Turbine To Test

GE Reports, 30 May 2018
Marc Sala has a huge challenge on his hands. The giant turbine he’s helping bring to market, the Haliade-X, will stand 260 meters tall, about the same height as New York’s iconic 30 Rockefeller Plaza skyscraper. With blades that are longer than a football field, the turbine will have a generator capable of producing 12 megawatts — 2.5 MW more than current turbines and enough to supply the equivalent energy needed to supply 16,000 homes. It could be a game-changer for the power industry.
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Preliminary report on Uber’s driverless car fatality shows the need for tougher regulatory controls

The Conversation, 29 May 2018
The US National Transportation Safety Board has released a damning preliminary report on the fatal crash in March between a cyclist and a driverless vehicle operated by Uber. The report does not attempt to determine “probable cause”. Nevertheless, it lists a number of questionable design decisions that appear to have greatly increased the risks of a crash during the trial period.
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Plain sailing: how traditional methods could deliver zero-emission shipping

The Conversation, 28 May 2018
On May 10, the 43.5-metre schooner Avontuur arrived in the port of Hamburg. This traditional sailing vessel, built in 1920, transported some 70 tonnes of coffee, cacao and rum across the Atlantic. The shipping company Timbercoast, which owns and operates Avontuur, says it aims to prove that sailing ships can offer an environmentally sustainable alternative to the heavily polluting shipping industry, despite being widely seen as a technology of yesteryear.
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A 100% renewable grid isn’t just feasible, it’s already happening

REnew Economy, 23 May 2018
The ongoing debate around whether it’s feasible to have an electric grid running on 100% renewable power in the coming decades often misses a key point: many countries and regions are already at or close to 100% now.
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Making cities more dense always sparks resistance. Here’s how to overcome it.

Vox, 5 May 2018
Urban density, done well, has all kinds of benefits. On average, people who live in dense, walkable areas tend to be physically healthier, happier, and more productive. Local governments pay less in infrastructure costs to support urbanites than they to support suburbanites. Per-capita energy consumption is lower in dense areas, which is good for air pollution and climate change. Plus, dense, walkable areas tend to be buzzy and culturally vibrant. There’s a reason they are often so expensive to live in — lots of people want to live there. Demand exceeds supply.

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Electric Buses Are Hurting the Oil Industry

Bloomberg, 24 April 2018
Electric buses were seen as a joke at an industry conference in Belgium seven years ago when the Chinese manufacturer BYD Co. showed an early model. “Everyone was laughing at BYD for making a toy,” recalled Isbrand Ho, the Shenzhen-based company’s managing director in Europe. “And look now. Everyone has one.”

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This Is How Big Oil Will Die

NewCo Shift, 24 May 2017
It’s 2025, and 800,000 tons of used high strength steel is coming up for auction. The steel made up the Keystone XL pipeline, finally completed in 2019, two years after the project launched with great fanfare after approval by the Trump administration. The pipeline was built at a cost of about $7 billion, bringing oil from the Canadian tar sands to the US, with a pit stop in the town of Baker, Montana, to pick up US crude from the Bakken formation. At its peak, it carried over 500,000 barrels a day for processing at refineries in Texas and Louisiana.

But in 2025, no one wants the oil.
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