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Posts from the ‘Cycling’ Category

Melbourne’s oBikes face impounding under anti-clutter crackdown

The Guardian, 17 October 2017
The operators of the distinctive yellow bicycles littering Melbourne will have two hours to move bikes left in dangerous places or face fines. Dozens of dockless bikes have been thrown up trees, on to train tracks and dumped in rivers by their users.
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Bike share schemes may seem a waste of space but the economics makes sense

ABC News, 19 September 2017
Have you ever walked past (or tripped over) a shared bike and wondered how it’s possible for the business to survive with a ride costing as little as $2 per half hour? While bike share schemes attract controversy in some places, the economic models behind such schemes actually have more to do with data mining, advertising and turning a profit from interest on the deposits than from the bike rental itself.

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Queensland Cycling Strategy

The Queensland Cycling Strategy sets the direction for encouraging more cycling, more often throughout Queensland. It is accompanied by an action plan and Queensland State of Cycling Report, which will be updated every two years to help us prioritise our efforts and respond to changes that impact cycling in Queensland.

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Cars, bicycles and the fatal myth of equal reciprocity

The Conversation, 17 August 2017
Any public conversation about on-road cycling in Australia seems to have only one metaphor for the relationship between drivers and cyclists: equal reciprocity. An utterance like “Drivers must respect cyclists’ space on the road” must inevitably be followed by something like “For their part, cyclists must ride responsibly and obey the road rules.”

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Are yellow oBikes taking over our footpaths?

The Age, 10 July 2017
By now you’ve probably seen the yellow bikes dotted across Melbourne’s landscape – maybe you’ve even tripped over one. Melbourne’s new bike sharing system oBike is certainly getting some mileage, with pushies popping up on random street corners and flooding bike racks from Richmond to the CBD.

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Cars overwhelmingly cause bike collisions, and the law should reflect that

The Conversation, 14 June 2017
Two hundred years after their invention, bicycles are widely recognised as an effective tool to combat physical and mental health problems, reduce congestion on urban roads and improve the quality of the environment. However, cycling participation across Australia is stagnating. This is mainly because of concerns about safety. A report released last week by the Royal Automobile Association of South Australia found that in the vast majority of crashes the cyclist was not at fault.
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Swapping car seats for electric bike saddles in WA

ABC News, 1 September 2016
The wheels are turning on a cycling revolution across Australia. Electric bicycles, known as e-bikes, have surged in popularity as an increasing number of people ditch driving for pedal power with an electric battery boost.
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Victoria’s bike lane budget lags behind most other states, report finds

The Age, 19 May 2017
Victorian cyclists have been short-changed by the Andrews government in the past two years, with a new report revealing it spent just $3 per person on cycling projects last financial year, the second lowest level in the country. Cycling group Bicycle Network said many of Melbourne’s principal bike routes were being neglected, putting a growing number of cyclists at risk of being hit.
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[UK] Cycling and walking investment strategy

UK Dept for Transport, 21 April 2017

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/cycling-and-walking-investment-strategy

Police and courts fail [UK] cyclists over road safety, says cross-party inquiry

The Guardian, 2 May 2017
Policing and the justice system are too often failing cyclists, making the roads too dangerous for people to ride on them, and then not properly prosecuting or banning motorists who commit offences, a cross-party group of MPs and peers has warned. Dangerous drivers are increasingly likely to be permitted by courts to stay behind the wheel, the report found, with the number of driving bans falling 62% over the last 10 years, and ever-more people claiming exceptional hardship to avoid a disqualification.
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