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Posts from the ‘Air transport’ Category

Reluctant Americans are behind Qantas’ quest to develop a cargo class

Sydney Morning Herald, 18 April 2018
Qantas’ “out there” idea to develop a new travel class in the cargo hold is aimed at getting middle-class Americans to shake off their reluctance to fly long-haul across the Pacific, Fairfax Media has learned. Last month, Fairfax Media revealed Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce had begun exploring a new “cargo class” concept which could be installed on super long-haul direct flights from Sydney to the US and London.
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Boeing raises prospect of only one pilot in the cockpit of planes

The Guardian, 9 February 2018
Once there were three on the flight deck. Then the number of flight crew fell to two when the Boeing 757 changed the way cockpits were designed in the 1980s. Now, jetmakers are studying what it would take to go down to a single pilot, starting with cargo flights.

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Ryanair chief: we won’t bow to laughable demands from pilots

The Guardian, 5 February 2018
Ryanair’s chief executive, Michael O‘Leary, has warned that the airline will not bow to “laughable” demands from pilots and would rather see strikes or disruptions than undermine its productivity. O’Leary said Ryanair was not as optimistic as some of its rivals that it would be able to push through fare rises this summer. Last year, the average fare was €41 (£36), down 13% from the year before. This year, fares will be cut by about 3%, Ryanair said.
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Qantas uses mustard seeds in first ever biofuel flight between Australia and US

The Guardian, 30 January 2018
A Qantas plane powered partly by mustard seeds has become the world’s first biofuel flight between Australia and the United States, after landing in Melbourne on Tuesday. The 15-hour flight used a blended fuel that was 10% derived from the brassica carinata, an industrial type of mustard seed that functions as a fallow crop – meaning it can be grown by farmers in between regular crop cycles.

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Qantas ‘worst major airline’ for fuel efficiency on trans-Pacific flights, study suggests

ABC News, 17 January 2018
Qantas has been ranked in a new study as the worst major airline for fuel efficiency and carbon emissions when flying across the Pacific. The International Council on Clean Transportation (ICCT) has analysed the fuel emissions of 20 major airlines conducting trans-Pacific flights. It ranked Qantas the worst in 2016, finding it burned on average 64 per cent more fuel per passenger-kilometre than the top ranked airlines, China-based Hainan and Japan’s ANA. A “passenger-kilometre” is defined as how many people you can fly 1 kilometre on 1 litre of fuel.
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Airbus A380s: Amedeo aircraft leasing company to create own airline for superjumbos

Traveller, 29 November 2017
An Irish aircraft leasing company is creating its own airline because it can’t find anyone to borrow its A380 superjumbos. Dublin-based Amedeo counts eight A380s among its fleet, and has a further 20 on order from Airbus, but such is the lack of interest in the world’s largest passenger plane that it has been unable to renew its leases, or find new customers, despite months of negotiations.

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Boeing is betting big on automating its flying machines.

CNN Money, 5 October 2017
The aerospace giant is buying Aurora Flight Sciences, a maker of automated drones and aviation parts, in a bid to bring increased automation to airliners, military drones and even personal air taxis. “The combined strength and innovation of our teams will advance the development of autonomy for our commercial and military systems,” said Greg Hyslop, chief technology officer and senior vice president of Boeing Engineering, Test & Technology in a statement.
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Turbulence could be making a more serious comeback in air travel

Crikey, 10 October 2017
One of the worst things about flying before the jet age began on a large scale in the late ’50s was turbulence, and resulting air sickness. But there are warnings, as well as some statistical claims, that things are getting rougher than before, despite the apparent smoothness of jet travel that has long been taken for granted by generations of air travellers. This week’s “return to your seat and buckle up” contribution to the genre comes from America’s ABC. It is based on an article in Geophysical Research Letters journal, and as is often the case, the general news story has a high tease-to-factual-content ratio that makes it less than useful to those of us who want to know what it is really about and how it might affect them.
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In a Warming World, Keeping the Planes Running

New York Times, 30 September 2017
Airports are a major global business, part of an industry that by one estimate transports the equivalent of nearly half the world’s population in a single year. But the world’s airports were largely designed for an older era — a cooler one.
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EasyJet says it could be flying electric planes within a decade

The Guardian, 28 September 2017
EasyJet could be flying planes powered by batteries rather than petroleum to destinations including Paris and Amsterdam within a decade. The UK carrier has formed a partnership with US firm Wright Electric, which is developing a battery-propelled aircraft for flights under two hours.
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