Skip to content

Archive for

Vertical retirement villages are on the rise, and they’re high-tech too

The Conversation, 27 June 2018
It is no secret people are living longer, thanks to advances in medical technology. Futurist Ray Kurzweil predicts we are approaching a point of breaking even – where for every year lived, science can extend lifespans by at least that much. And more than 80% of Kurzweil’s predictions have so far proved correct. But length of life and quality of life are not the same thing. For good quality of life as one ages, there must be optimal retirement options. The default is to stay in one’s current home for as long as possible, or downsize. Some will settle into the quiet life of a retirement village on the urban fringes.
Read more

Growing cities face challenges of keeping the masses moving up, down and across

The Conversation, 4 June 2018
Cities worldwide face the problems and possibilities of “volume”: the stacking and moving of people and things within booming central business districts. We see this especially around mass public transport hubs. As cities grow, they also become more vertical. They are expanding underground through rail corridors and above ground into the tall buildings that shape city skylines. Cities are deep as well as wide.
Read more

Seven reasons why the Internal Combustion Engine is a dead man wlaking

Tom Raftey’s internet of things, 27 June 2018
The age of the Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) is over. Electric cars are the future. The transition has just begun, but the move from ICE vehicles to Electric will happen sooner and more quickly than most people suspect. What are the factors that lead me to say this with such confidence?
Read more

Higher density and diversity: apartments are Australia at its most multicultural

The Conversation, 19 June 2018
Increasing numbers of city dwellers live in apartments. This is particularly the case for migrants. And that makes apartment buildings important hubs of multiculturalism in our cities. However, our recent research shows that researchers and policymakers have largely overlooked the implications of this combination of increasing cultural diversity and increasing housing density. We live in an environment of increasing cultural diversity. But we also see increasing racism in Australian society, as well as a rise in racialised tension about Chinese property buyers.
Read more

Time to rethink your SUV? Australia’s cars among the dirtiest, new report warns

Sydney Morning Herald, 12 June 2018
Australia’s car emissions are dirtier than those of Europe and the US, with experts pointing to Australians’ love of SUVs. In Australia, cars last year had a carbon emissions intensity of 171.5 grams per kilometre – 45 per cent higher than Europe (118.5gm/km), a new National Transport Commission report warns. This was also higher than the US, according to a separate analysis by an independent nonprofit, International Council on Clean Transportation, which set the measure for vehicle efficiency at 141g/km.

Read more

Australia EV uptake hindered by long road to price parity

RE new economy, 8 June 2018
Australia is lagging well behind the rest of the world in EV sales, and one of the key reasons for this is because Australians have to drive further before the cost of owning an electric vehicle breaks even, a new report says.
Read more

Nature’s traffic engineers have come up with many simple but effective solutions

The Conversation, 7 June 2018
As more and more people move to cities, the experience of being stuck in impenetrable gridlock becomes an increasingly common part of the human experience. But managing traffic isn’t just a human problem. From the tunnels built by termites to the enormous underground networks built by fungi, life forms have evolved incredible ways of solving the challenge of moving large numbers of individuals and resources from one place to another.

But how do natural systems – which lack engineers or in some cases even brains – build and manage their transportation networks?
Read more

First two retired A380 superjumbos to be broken up for parts

Traveller, 7 June 2018
Two of Airbus’s flagship A380 superjumbos are headed for the scrap heap after a search for new operators failed to secure firm bids.

Negotiations with British Airways, Iran Air and Hi Fly, a Portuguese charter specialist, ended without any deals, German investment fund Dr. Peters, which manages the planes, said in a statement to shareholders. The aircraft are already parked in the foothills of the French Pyrenees, where they will be filleted over the next two years by a specialist company and sold in parts.

Read more

Three 20-plus storey towers to sit around new Waterloo metro station

Sydney Morning Herald, 31 May 2018
Seven hundred apartments will be built on a large block around a new rail station in inner-Sydney Waterloo, government documents show. The Waterloo “Metro Quarter” proposal by the government’s UrbanGrowth Development Corporation and Sydney Metro, made available on Wednesday, includes four residential towers of 29, 25, 23 and 14 storeys.

Read more

Proving Ground: This U.K. Facility Is Preparing To Put The World’s Largest Wind Turbine To Test

GE Reports, 30 May 2018
Marc Sala has a huge challenge on his hands. The giant turbine he’s helping bring to market, the Haliade-X, will stand 260 meters tall, about the same height as New York’s iconic 30 Rockefeller Plaza skyscraper. With blades that are longer than a football field, the turbine will have a generator capable of producing 12 megawatts — 2.5 MW more than current turbines and enough to supply the equivalent energy needed to supply 16,000 homes. It could be a game-changer for the power industry.
Read more

css.php